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Monday, 21 May 2018 00:00

If you notice a portion of skin on the foot that appears to be thickened in certain areas, you may have what is referred to as a corn. It may develop in different areas of the foot, although it’s common for a corn to form on the pinky toe. The most common cause for this condition is pressure inflicted on the affected area. Shoes that are too small or deformed foot structures such as hammertoe may be causes for corns to develop and flourish. There are two types of corns most people are affected by: hard corns and soft corns. The latter is typically found in between the toes, and may form due to excess moisture. Hard corns are present on the outer skin of the toes, and are the most common. Both types of corns can cause severe discomfort and measures should be taken to relieve the pressure that caused them. A consultation with a podiatrist is suggested for additional information about how to remove and prevent corns.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack of Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What are they? And how do you get rid of them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them
Monday, 14 May 2018 00:00

Many women choose to wear high heels for the pleasing look it gives to the leg. Occasionally, there may be consequences that are experienced, including falling which may result in a twisted or sprained ankle or the development of calluses and blisters. Heel pain is a common symptom of frequently wearing high heels and this typically produces extreme discomfort. Additionally, deformities may develop in the toes as a result of limited room for adequate movement to occur. There are several prevention techniques that may be implemented to relieve any ailments that may result from wearing high heels. These often include alternating between flat and high heeled shoes which can give the feet the ample rest they may need in addition to stretching the feet as often as possible. Selecting high heels with enough room for the toes may be an option for daily wearers of this type of shoe.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack from Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which parts of my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Effect of High Heels on the Feet
Monday, 07 May 2018 00:00

One of the first ways to tell if poor circulation exists in the feet is by the numbness and tingling that is often experienced. More severe examples may be a cold feeling that develops in the feet in addition to possible cramping. Poor circulation may be a symptom of vascular disease which often occurs with blocked arteries. When this occurs, the blood is not carrying adequate amounts of oxygen to and away from the heart, and this is often noticed in the feet. The development of sores on the feet may be a sign that poor circulation exists, and may have difficulty in healing properly. You may also notice a slower growth pattern in your toenails If you feel you may have poor circulation in your feet, speaking with a podiatrist is recommended.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Warren Pasternack of Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness  or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD, and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 30 April 2018 00:00

One uncomfortable deformity of the middle toes is hammertoe. The name is derived from the word “hammer,” as a result of the toe bending in the middle of the joint. It is typically caused by unbalanced muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the toe and will get increasingly worse if it is ignored and treatment is not sought. If certain shoes are worn, such as high heels that have a small area for the toes, the risk of developing this ailment is heightened. Other causes may include a predisposed inherited gene, certain forms of arthritis that may alter the bone structure of the foot, or injuries such as stubbing the toe. Some of the symptoms that may be experienced can be swelling and redness surrounding the affected area, open sores or corns that can form on the top of the toe, or having difficulty in keeping the toe straight. There are ways to prevent this condition from developing, such as choosing to wear shoes that have adequate toe room. If you are affected by hammertoe, see a podiatrist to learn about the best treatment options for you.

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack of Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that occurs due to an imbalance in the muscles, tendons, or ligaments that normally hold the toe straight. It can be caused by the type of shoes you wear, your foot structure, trauma, and certain disease processes.

Symptoms

  • Painful and/or difficult toe movement
  • Swelling
  • Joint stiffness
  • Calluses/Corns
  • Physical deformity

Risk Factors

  • Age – The risk of hammertoe increases with age
  • Sex – Women are more likely to have hammertoe compared to men
  • Toe Length – You are more likely to develop hammertoe if your second toe is longer than your big toe
  • Certain Diseases – Arthritis and diabetes may make you more likely to develop hammertoe

Treatment

If you have hammertoe, you should change into a more comfortable shoe that provides enough room for your toes. Exercises such as picking up marbles may strengthen and stretch your toe muscles. Nevertheless, it is important to seek assistance from a podiatrist in order to determine the severity of your hammertoe and see which treatment option will work best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What Are Hammertoes?
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